"As a white female rapper mistakes appropriation for artistry, here’s how black women remain pushed to the sidelines "

""We talk about celebrity, about charts, about digital distribution — what we do not talk about enough is sound," said Luke Wood, president of Beats Electronics speaking on a panel of prolific music producers and artists. Getting consumers to not only care about access to music, but the quality of music has been the challenge facing headphone manufacturers since the advent of digital music."

"You have the power now. What are you going to do with it? For the first time in its long history, the American music business is firmly in the hands of the artists and the consumers. You have the ability to lead the industry wherever you want it to go."

"One possible explanation for Apple’s interest in Beats might be the booming “wearable computing” space. After all, Beats’ signature product is the high-bass headphone unit. If Apple can incorporate the Beats product into its wearable computing system — think Internet connected headphones — then the deal could pose a threat to Google, Facebook, and other companies that are forging ahead on smart glasses and watches."

"Pop icon Erykah Badu just performed for Swaziland’s brutal dictator. Her response to being called out for it is worse than the performance itself."

"More significant, of course, is what the new arrangement says about artists’ control of their back catalog. The deal turns in large part on the copyright recapture, or a provision that lets artists reacquire their copyrights thirty-five years after an album’s release. "

"But Spotify is hopeful that Filipino music lovers would eventually shift from illegal downloads to music streaming. “Our service is free and quicker than downloads, because the songs are cached in the cloud,” Kaur says."

"Record bosses now hope that online streaming could become a big enough business to arrest their industry’s long decline"

"To imagine that the problem is still as simple as the turn of the millennium is not only to fail at working with local music history; it’s also to fail in actually providing a baseline that is real and concrete for the present, one that takes cognizance of the diversity that has happened because and despite digital media, because and despite the decline of the mainstream recording industry between the years 1999 and 2010."

"Top executives of the global recorded music industry said on Tuesday they were optimistic about growth despite figures for 2013 showing an almost 4 percent annual decline in revenues to $15 billion, blamed largely on the Japanese market."

"This popular Filipino host does not know Asin. Should I be surprised if the songs he’s familiar with are from Rihanna or a popular RnB artist in the US?"

"It’s as tidy a demonstration as I know of the fact—deeper than ska, deeper than Rosco, deeper than the South—that black popular music in the twentieth century can’t be comprehended except as a phenomenon of what Bernard Bailyn calls the Atlantic world. In this case the old West Indian world, of which Tennessee lay at the northern fringe. It’s the shatter-zone of the slave diaspora. Circulating currents. We gave Jamaica blues. Jamaica gave us ska. Jamaica gave us dub, we gave back hip-hop. It’s been happening for four hundred years."

"The stunning prevalence of repetition in music all over the world is no accident. Music didn’t acquire the property of repetitiveness because it’s less sophisticated than speech, and the 347 times that iTunes says you have listened to your favourite album isn’t evidence of some pathological compulsion – it’s just a crucial part of how music works its magic. "